UrbanitAs: The Other City Dwellers aka Urban Animals, Glasgow Edition

UrbanitAnimals. We live side by side. We call them pests, vermins, #mprracoon, pets, …

As a common human behaviour, we exterminate the ones we afraid of, and do everything for keeping the ones we like around. The only thing we cannot do is to accept them as city-dwellers, just like us humans.

Here I present you UrbanitAs: The Other City Dwellers aka Urban Animals. This is a photo series formed by the photos I took at different times and in several cities. I believe we are too late to acknowledge that we are just another species dwelling here on this planet. But, perhaps looking around while strolling on the streets and realising that we are already living with a bunch of others side by side even in the most human-made environment (aka cities) may change our perspective.

This edition is dedicated to UrbanitAs living in the mighty city of Glasgow, and will be updates due course.

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The Battle of Chalkboards, Glasgow Pubs

Pub chalkboards: funny, authentic, vulgar, cynical, attention-seeking, and more ūüėÄ

However they are, they are always of my interest, and the¬†great city of Glasgow is a goldmine for them ūüôā

I started to take their photos as every day I pass by a pub that writes quite funny ones.

Here is a collection of pub chalkboards from Glasgow. Let the battle of chalkboards begin and enjoy! (My favourite is the number 6)

I will update the list time to time ūüôā

 

 

 

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Glassford Street
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Ingram Street
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Hutchinson Street
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A brutally honest one, Hutchinson Street
Waterloo Street
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Renfrew Street
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Ingram Street
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Miller Street
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Miller Street
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Glassford Street
Miller Street
Miller Street

 

 

Stories Behind: A Duke with a Cone?

There are some statues that mark their presence with a twist. And, this is one of them: the statue of Duke of Wellington in Glasgow.

The statue is a part of the cityscape and famous with its cone on top of it.

The statue was erected in 1844. So, the story goes back some time. Not a definite one. It is not certain when the cone was first placed. But, one day, people of Glasgow woke up with a scene that an equestrian statue of a mighty Duke appeared to have a traffic cone on its head.

The statue was listed one of the top ten most bizarre monuments on Earth by Lonely Planet (inews). The statu¬†is loved by the public and the tourists that it has many appearances¬†such as the one below: a replica of the statue erected¬†in the opening ceremony of Glasgow‚Äôs 2014 Commonwealth Games. Lovely, isn’t it?

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Image Credit: inews

Despite the statu’s popularity, the cone was removed and put back several times. The council even enacted some plans to end this tradition of putting the cone back. The plans were backfired, for obvious reasons. Who does not like a Duke with a cone? Why would it be another boring man with a horse?

The council had said that raising the height would end a practice which projected a “depressing image” of Glasgow and would save the ¬£10,000 cost of removing the cone 100 times a year. The scheme would have seen a new granite-clad concrete base of 86cm (34in) added to the memorial to raise its overall height.

However, the council has reconsidered its decision¬†after an online petition called “Save Wellington’s Cone”, which gathered thousands of signatories in just a few hours, and a Facebook campaign which had planned a rally in support of the cone.

A council spokesman said: “The wording of the report was appalling and the leader of the council (Gordon Matheson) has instructed officers to withdraw the planning application.”¬†(BBC)

In addition, as the campaigners state “The cone on Wellington’s head is an iconic part of Glasgow’s heritage, and means far more to the people of Glasgow and to visitors than Wellington himself ever has.” (BBC). Also, in the¬†campaign, there are a couple of good points which may affect the council’s decision such as¬† “does anyone really think that a raised plinth will deter drunk Glaswegians?”. Well, I agree with that!

There is one point we are not quite sure: What would Duke Wellington think about this? Luckily we have historians! According to inews, Dudley-Edwards argues that “Wellington himself would have been amused by the practice and embodied the ‚Äėkeep it coney‚Äô ethos” as “He liked to keep it real”.

At the end of the day, the pair of the statue and the cone is a Rabelaisian embodiment, a standing in-your-face against mightiness of equestrian figures. While equestrian figures are usually associated with power and glorification of a person, the cone turns the statue into a human being again. It leaves you with a smile (and with a selfie apparently if you are visiting the city).

Even better, the statue is located right in front of the Gallery of Modern Art as the second twist in this story.

Yes, that is right. There is a classical equestrian statue right in front of a modern art gallery and it has a cone on the top of its head!

Bonus: A rare shot of the statue without a cone, but with a seagull!

 

(Image Credit: Top inews )